LARP

Renaissance Sales & Specials!

 

sale-journe-gown-3Have you seen the fabulous sale items at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe? This is a great chance to save on clearance, discontinued, and overstocked items! All items listed are NEW and NEVER worn. This sale is good for the quantities, colors, and sizes listed on the site and only while supplies last so hurry to get your Renaissance deals today!

One of the great options on sale right now from Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe is our elegant Queen Elizabeth Nobility Dress. Inspired by Renaissance Nobility style this one-piece dress closes with laces at the back and is boned to get that perfect silhouette. It sports graceful long hanging arms and is decorated with crystal and feathers. We recommend a hoop skirt for beneath your skirts to achieve the perfect profile.

If you are looking for something versatile to get the most out of your Ren Wear try Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe’s stylish Ren Doublet. This doublet is reversible, made of velveteen with a black twill backing so you can be the dashing nobleman or, with a simple flip of your doublet, a common peasant. Currently available in red or burgundy.

Take advantage of the great price on our Lady of Leeds Gown before they’re gone! This elegant full length gown features drop sleeves with a front split, lined with gold brocade fabric. This gown features an accented square neckline and elbows. Lacing up the back is provided to achieve your shapeliest fit!

Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe currently has several great separates on clearance! Our Charles Vane Pirate Shirt is made of thick rich Viscose fabric with a double ruffle down the chest and wrists fit for any dashing pirate. Our Dagget Sleeve Chemise tops come in several different colors. They’re baggy and versatile to be gathered and worn beneath a bodice, corset, or a waist cincher. They can be worn on or off the shoulders, fitting be ye a sassy wench or fine noble Lady. Our fashionable Maiden Skirts are made of 100% lightweight muslin cotton and are fully lined. These beauties are soft, breathable, and slightly transparent for any fine miss to shine with elegance. Pearson’s Period Cotton Shirts feature a stand up collar with a lace up front. Wide sleeves with an elastic gather at the wrists are roomy for any ample hunter needing room to pull his bow strings taught.

Get all of these fabulous treasures and more at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe Sales & Specials! Are you looking to expand your Renaissance wardrobe? Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have all the high quality Renaissance clothing, jewelry, and footwear to meet all your needs! We even have Renaissance clothing for little Ren fans. Shop Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe Sales & Specials today!

Renaissance Winter

It’s that time of year again where there is a nip in the air. The sparkling white snow is creating a chilly blanket across the fair land. Far and wide the people are donning their woolen coats, hooded capes, fine over gowns, and hooded cloaks. Are you in search of some fine winter garb? Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has exactly what you need!

Have you seen Pearson’s Queen of Shemakhan Wool Coat? With details of Asian Manchoo Costume along with elements of the Balkanian style this is definitely an elegant choice for any authentic LARPer. This is a slim fit coat made of high quality natural wool with a black satin lining. The hood boasts a black faux fur boarder. Intricate ribbon trim accents this winter wonder. Accessories that come with this beautiful floor length coat are a  fur trimmed hat, a fur muff, and a matching wool bag.

Another fabulous option is our Templar Hooded Cape. Whether you are a fine Lord or Knight of the Realm this is the option for you! Made of white cotton with a velvet cross stitched over the left arm. The front is secured with a decorative rondel leather frog with a snap closure. It is 52 inches long and matches our Templar tunic. It also sports a hood to complete the look.

Are you interested in looking royal? Try our Anne Boleyn Overgown, designed for the Anne Boleyn character in the award winning series “The Tudors.” As the second and most famous wife of King Henry VIII this gown is fit for any Queen. A open outer robe made of heavyweight cotton and richly adorned with faux fur with openings at the elbows instead of sleeves for your arms. You’re sure to keep warm in this cuddly overgown on any cold winter day.

Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have cloaks for every need; from cotton, velvet, twill, wool, leather lined, and fur trimmed we have the hooded cloak that’s right for you. Our Medieval Wool Cloak is a great accessory for just about any attire. Made of heavy natural green wool with a handmade wool border, this warm cloak has no machine stitching at all and is a great authentic option.

Are you looking for a warm winter option to complete your Medieval Costume? Be sure to check out Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe’s great selection of Hooded Capes and Cloaks today!

Medieval Jewelry, the Perfect Accessory!

Are you an authentic LARPer or SCA actor? Then you know it’s important to have a complete costume from your chemise to your corset, right down to your leather boots. Portraying a person of wealth and status? Everyone knows in the medieval times the best way to portray a higher caste without a castle in tow is to flaunt your accessories! Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have everything to meet your medieval jewelry needs:

Medieval Crowns & Princess Tiaras

Pearson’s has a wide variety of medieval crowns from King Richards Crown to the Crown of Elrond, the White Queen’s Crown, to the embellished Residing Power Crown. Whether you are a Royal King of England, Dazzling Queen of the realm, or the Elven King of a faraway land Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has the right medieval crown for you! Pearson’s also carries many tiaras and circlets from simple and elegant to finely embellished to match any maidens dreams!

Renaissance Necklaces

Considering the necklines of the times the best renaissance jewelry you can get to display your status is a necklace! Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe carries necklaces for everyone. The swashbuckling pirate wouldn’t be complete without our beautiful Pirate Pendant that hosts a hidden blade. Our medieval pear shaped necklace with matching earrings would be perfect for the glamorous Queen. The modest maiden would have a touch of elegance with our Autumn in Red Choker. Let’s not forget the elegant elven damsel who wouldn’t be complete without an Elven Leaf necklace and earring set.

Medieval Earrings and Bracelets

Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has a wide selection of medieval earrings and bracelets for every occasion and style. We even carry elegant armbands, ear hooks, and ear cuffs. If you’re looking for the perfect renaissance jewelry accessory you need look no further than Pearson’s!

LOTR Inspired Circlets & Chainmaile Headpieces

Do you love Lord of the Rings? Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has the perfect medieval jewelryfor you! Our exquisite circlets and headpieces are handcrafted with care! We only use Lobster claw clasps that don’t tangle or pull your hair. Here at Pearson’s we never use acrylic or plastic, only REAL crystals and gemstones! We never substitute a cheap inferior product with all the beautiful cut crystals, gemstones and other beads available. Only the best we are able to obtain will do for these stunning one of a kind creations! No matter what event you attend these authentic looking circlets and headpieces will be the shimmering finish to your garb!

Men’s Medieval Jewelry

Last but not least Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe boasts a wide selection of adornment for a man of any stature be he knight, baron, pirate or king. Choose from Crowns of gold, silver, or brass. Are you a Knight of noble standing? Complete your garb with our knightly chain! Swashbuckling pirate or weaver of magic? Try our finely crafted medieval jewelry to adorn your neck!

At Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe you will find the highest quality Renaissance Jewelry. No matter your needs here at Pearson’s we have the perfect renaissance jewelry and accessories to complete any look! Shop Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe today!

The Truth About Corsets

When we think of corsets we think of the tight, pinching, poking, waist binding garments that we read about in historical romance novels. A garment any forward thinking modern woman would not wear. The truth is, however, that starting in the 16th century when they became popular, corsets were made for the person that was to wear them and them alone. At least up until the Victorian era when “mail order” corsets were created. Pinching was impossible and if they poked it meant that the boning had come loose from the corset. In the beginning corsets were not made to give you a small waist; the fabric would have given out if you had tried to tighten them enough to narrow your figure. They were designed to lift the breasts and create a smooth silhouette beneath clothing. Not until the mid to late 1800s when the metal grommet (1828) and the 2 part metal busk (1829) were created tightening a corset enough to drastically change a person’s figure was practically impossible.

As romance novels lead us to believe a heroine could go without her corset and her gowns will still fit perfectly and one wouldn’t notice her corset was missing until she was touched. The truth is that her gown would not fall correctly. It would even possibly be lumpy in places and, as with forgoing wearing a bra, her breasts would not be held up and would bounce with movement.

While being so uncomfortable as to lack the ability to breathe is untrue, it is a fact that you are unable to take deep breaths while wearing a corset. It is also true that a tightly tied corset can cause weals on the skin, just as a sock might around your ankle. If there was a weight gain or loss the corset would no longer fit properly and cause rubbing or the breasts to slip down in the corset which would be quite uncomfortable. If the corset has shoulder straps the arm movements would be somewhat limited; while our dear heroine would be able to fold her arms across her chest she would be unable to do so tightly. If she is wearing a busk she would be able to bend at the hips but not the waist. The strict rules in past times regarding posture are untrue although the corset does demand and encourage a straight back.

As with most things that go from person to person many things most people believe about corsets are false but they all come from an exaggeration of a truth. When worn properly and with the right fit a corset can be a lovely addition to any Lady or Lord’s Renaissance Garb.

Are you looking to add a corset to your medieval wardrobe? Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have all the high quality corsets you could ask for to meet your needs! Be sure to shop Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe‘s Corset Collection today! Custom sizing and fitting is available to help you look your best!

Pouches & Sporrans

For as long as people have needed to carry things; papers, currency, Bibles, holy relics, keys and any other pertinent personal items, people have needed a way to carry them. A simple pouch was created for this use. The earliest use shows pouches were used to carry seeds. In the 1400s women were known to carry ornate bags called “handmoneys” or “tasques.” Around the 1500s more thought was put into the pouches as evidenced by decoration and utilization. They were commonly associated with marriage; a man would often give a woman a pouch decorated with love stories as a bride gift. Knights would often carry purses called “chaneries” filled with game or food for their falcons. Men and women alike used the pouches, usually worn on a leather strap around the waist. In the late 16th century to early 17th century pockets became popular in clothing and men’s use in the pouch declined. In later years the pouches evolved to handbags, clutches, and purses.

The sporran in particular originated around the 12th century in the Scottish Highlands. The men wore kilts made of long tartan, about two yards wide by four to six yards in length. Gathered around the waist and held with a tight belt, it fell to the knees and was fastened with a broach or pin over the left shoulder. As the tartan held no pockets the sporran was born out of necessity. Early sporrans were simple in design, usually made of leather or skin, gathered at the top with a simple drawstring or by thongs ornamented with small tassels. Starting in the late 17th century metal clasps of brass or silver were fitted to the sporrans, along with flap-tops and large tassels with a variety of hair and furs, and completed with a badgers head. The sporran is still in use today.

If you are going to the Renaissance Faire you don’t want to worry about losing all of your personal items. Why not tuck them away in a Renaissance Belt Pouch? Need a little bit more room than just a belt pouch? Alright then, how about trying one of the Scottish Sporrans? Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has a pouch or sporran for every style from Medieval drawstring pouches, to leather Elven pouch bags, to sporrans with braided tassels, to Pirate pouch bags, and even Medieval bags etched with steel.

So make sure that if you are browsing the marketplace for Renaissance pouches and sporrans that you stop by PearsonsRenaissanceShoppe.com. You will love our wide selection of pouches and sporrans that are sure to keep your personal items nice and safe at Renaissance Faires and LARP events!


A Modern Renaissance Soup

When I searched for authentic medieval recipes I came up with a lot of different options. I decided for my first foray into Medieval cooking that I would start simple and, with the help of my Queen of Renaissance Aunt, I decided to go with a Savory Barley Soup with Wild Mushrooms and Thyme that I found. Of course I was unable to find half of the required ingredients (or they cost a fortune, like saffron) so here is my personal version of the recipe:

Savory Barley Soup with Wild Mushrooms and Thyme

½ cup dry white wine

1 Tbs. Olive oil

½ cup chopped shallots

4 garlic cloves, minced

16oz cremini mushrooms, 8oz chopped, 8oz whole

1 tsp minced fresh thyme OR ½ tsp dried

4 cups vegetable broth

¾ cup pearl barley

3 cups water

1 Tbs tomato paste

2 tsp fresh squeezed lemon juice

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions:

Bring the wine to a simmer in a small saucepan. Add the mushrooms and allow the liquid to cook down, until the mushrooms are tender. Turn off the heat and set aside. In a large heavy pot warm the oil over medium-high heat. Add the chopped shallots and the minced garlic. Saute about 3 to 5 minutes or until the shallots are softened. Add the mushrooms from your saucepan, ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp pepper, and the thyme. Cook 1-2 minutes and then add the broth, tomato paste, barley, and water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer until the barley is softened, about 45 to 50 minutes. Remove the soup from heat and allow to cool slightly. With a hand blender puree about 1 cup of the soup. Return to heat until hot, add lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste, and stir. Your soup is ready to eat! Serves 4-8 depending on bowl size.

 

We served our medieval soup in bread bowl trenchers. I started my dough for my bread bowls about 2.5 hours prior to my soup as they need at least 1.5 to 2 hours to rise. I know it’s not super authentic, being a white bread rather than black, but I knew no one in our family would actually eat a black bread so here is my modern medieval version.

Simple Bread Bowls

6 1/3 cup Flour

1 tbsp Salt

2 ¼ tsp Yeast x2 OR 2 pkgs

3 cups Water

1 tbsp EVOO

Directions:

Mix all dry ingredients in a large bowl. Add water and stir until fully incorporated. Kneading is not necessary, but I did a little to make sure everything was fully mixed. Remove your dough from the bowl, rinse the bowl and rub with EVOO (prevents dough from sticking.) Return dough to the bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to sit in a warm area for 1-2 hours until the dough has doubled. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Punch down the dough and roll it out on a floured surface. (I doubled our bread bowl recipe and cut about 12 bowls.) With this recipe you should get at least 6 large bread bowls or 12 small – depending on how big you want your bread bowls to be. Round your dough and set on a baking sheet to rise again, allow about 20-30 minutes. They will rise more once you put them in the oven. Bake for about 40 minutes. Brush with melted butter or olive oil 10 minutes prior to removing them from the oven. This will give them a nice golden color. When done allow them to cool. Use a bread knife to cut the tops in a circle and use your fingers to even out the inside and make room for your soup. Serve with the top next to your bowl for dipping. Enjoy!

 

A Renaissance Wedding in the 21st Century

Renaissance wedding holds a certain amount of charm and allure that most modern weddings cannot hold a candle to. The old world style and traditions from many cultures mix and match to make your own special day the most magical. Most weddings today stem from a mix of these traditions from long ago. Perhaps our “something blue” comes from the tradition of the bride and groom wearing a band of blue ribbon, as blue was considered the color of purity and the most common medieval wedding dress color. White did not come into fashion as strict wedding color until Queen Victoria married in 1840.

In actuality it was usually the Lady’s best medieval dress that was worn for her wedding, no matter the color. The bridesmaids and groomsmen would dress similarly to the bride and groom to confuse those who would wish evil upon the happy couple on their wedding day. The veil, brought home to medieval Europe by Knights after the Crusades, was a symbol of purity and also used to ward off evil. If the season allowed, the women would hold a lovely posy which also served a purpose; to ward off the smell as bathing was not a top priority in the Renaissance period.

During the Renaissance the higher caste held their wedding ceremonies in their castles while the lower caste would celebrate in their own homes or the tavern. A handfasted or betrothed couple would have their union later approved by the priest or clergy, either when they went to the church or he stopped by their homeduring his traveling rounds (even then there was a shortage of ordained ministers.)Later in the Middle Ages, when the church reigned, the wedding was moved to the church or the church door and was overseen by the priest. Often weddings would be arranged for personal gain, whether it be property, a title, money, or a treaty. This was especially the case for the nobility.

The best part of Renaissance weddings were the grand feasts that always accompanied them, whether you were peasant or nobility. Everyone would eat with their fingers and dine on a variety of delicious fare. Some of the delights that could have been served at a Renaissance marriage feast were: venison, roasted boar (sanglier), goose, fish, quail, roasted peacock, mutton, cheeses, fresh fruits, nuts, oysters steamed in almond milk, stewed cabbage, custards and tarts, and spicy mulled wine. Many vegetables were known to this time period but few were eaten. Available to drink werewine, ale, beer, mead, milk, and water, to list only a few of the options they had.

Are you looking to celebrate your love in an old fashioned way in a highly technological day? Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe opens the door to high quality renaissance wedding gowns, and even clothing for your wedding party in a variety of renaissance dresses and medieval dresses. Don’t forget your groom and groomsmen. Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has authentic medieval clothing for men, from fine doublets, vests, and coats, all the way down to breeches, kilts, and boots. Don’t forget the little members of your wedding party! Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has a lovely selection of girls medieval dresses and boys medieval clothing as well. Lastly, every bride needs some beautiful medieval jewelry or even a crown.

Shire of Three Maples

On May 16, 2015 we attended the New Hampshire Renaissance Faire in Kingston, NH, bedecked in finery from Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe . There we strolled along the lanes of the Shire of Three Maples entrenched in a world where you leave the 21st Century behind and become a part of history in the remaking. Here you will find technology left behind and tents and chivalry risen. Flowing skirts and armored knights abound, fair peddlers selling their wares, swords and pouches attached to peoples sides instead of cell phones.

Among the many to attend the Faire were wenches with flowing skirts and low cut chemises, corsets displaying assets. Brave knights bedecked in shining silver armor, bowing with flourish to Lady’s and children alike. Fair maidens, archers, and elves, courtly Lord’s bending a knee in hello. The King and Queen also made an appearance. My personal favorite was the guardsman at the entrance, flourishing his feathered hat in greeting, saying “Good Morrow” with a big smile and a cheery wave.

We attended a Joust to see the brave knights atop huge steeds brandishing their lances and charging to clash in the middle. Armored from head to toe in shining steel they bravely met upon the field, lance tips flying as they shattered off each others shields. Holding no ill will against each other they smiled and shared words with the crowd, even allowing the smallest Faire attendees to pet their steeds.

Some other entertainment that we saw was Archery, Storytelling, Singing Pirates, Sword fighting, Belly Dancing, Bagpipes and more. At several points among the Shire were areas where you could take a turn at shooting an arrow from a bow yourself, or sword fighting with a pirate. We bought a rose from a flower peddler and she serenaded us with a sweet lilting voice as she bestowed us with a sweet smelling rose.

The Shire of Three Maples was also home to some amazing food. Sweets and Turkey Legs were available of course, but some more modern meals were also procurable: hot dogs, sausage subs with onions and pepper, kettle corn, and even deep fried Oreos. We tried the Wood-fired Pizza (courtesy of Stone Oven Catering) and it was melt in your mouth amazing.

At the end of the day, happy and leg sore, we headed back to the gates where the guardsman saw us off with a joke and a grin and we reentered the 21st century once again. The Shire hosts one of the smaller Renaissance Faire’s around but we will definitely be returning to the quaint mischievous atmosphere next year.

 

Delicious Non-Alcoholic Renaissance Drinks Part 2

As we continue our series about non-alcoholic Renaissance drinks, we’re going to talk about some of the more ornate drinks. These drinks might be a little harder to replicate today, but with a little imagination and ingenuity, you can probably come up with a delicious recipe using today’s ingredients. When you are wearing authentic Renaissance period clothes, you will certainly complete the look with beverage that comes as close to what people actually drank back then. If you come up with any great recipes, or if you find any more Renaissance drinks, let us know in the comments section. Who knows – maybe we’ll have a Part 3, featuring your ideas!

  • Sekanjabin is a very exotic-sounding drink and it was made using a variety of sweet vinegar and sugar. We’ve never tried it, and although vinegar and sugar does not sound all that appetizing, it was quite popular during the Renaissance.
  • Honey has been a wonderful beverage ingredient for so many years, it seems! During the Renaissance, there was no shortage of honey in drinks. One of the most popular drinks to use honey was called Clarea of Water. This drink was a mixture of water, honey, and various types of spices, depending on what was local. The ingredients were mixed together and boiled. The drink would be cooled before it was served.
  • We thought we’d conclude our series with a quick and easy recipe for a drink that is just as popular now as it was back then: Rose/Lavender soda! This recipe comes from a cookbook dating back to around 1400:
    • 1 part rose/lavender petals
    • 2 parts water
    • 2 parts sugar/honey
    • Soak a number of petals in a pitcher of water holding twice as much water as petals for one night. Press, but not squeeze, the water from the petals and reuse them as needed. Mix into the water enough honey or sugar as to taste, and serve cold.

Delicious Non-Alcoholic Renaissance Drinks Part 1

Visit any Renaissance Faire and you will see a huge assortment of delicious Renaissance fashion drinks. From mulled wine to mead, there are plenty of tasty drinks that are great representations of what people in the Renaissance era drank. But suppose you don’t drink alcoholic beverages? It may seem like all you hear about is drinks with alcohol, but there were plenty of non-alcoholic drinks consumed during the Renaissance – some of them are still available today! Here are some of the most popular non-alcoholic drinks from this great time period!

  • While there may have been a strict class system during the Renaissance, one thing was for sure: people of all classes enjoyed milk! Milk was accessible to everyone, and it came from goats, cows, and mares.
  • An interesting brew that can be replicated today was sage water. Sage water was made by soaking sage in water overnight. This brew was used to cleanse the palette during meals.
  • We’ve all had a tasty Shirley Temple at some point. The grenadine-and-ginger ale combination is one of the best drinks around! Of course, people in the Renaissance era didn’t have Shirley Temples per se, but they had their own version of grenadine, called granatus. Granatus, like grenadine, was made using pomegranates and was most popular in Arabic countries.