Medieval Costumes

Renaissance Faire Costumes: Stand Out from the Crowd

Catherine of Aragon DressNow I understand! The King and Queen are throwing a summer festival and you want an outfit that you can wear so that you stand out from the crowd. At first I was confused because you came into my shop asking me if I have Renaissance Faire Costumes when you are already wearing that! I wanted to know why you were looking for Renaissance costumes when you could just wear your normal Renaissance clothes. But now I see where you are coming from: You want something special. Very special. Don’t you worry your pretty little head, I’ll take care of you!

Renaissance Dresses

Well if you want Renaissance Faire Costumes that stand out from the normal rabble, then perhaps you should looking into one of my Renaissance Dresses. These dresses are spun from the finest wool, cotton, and silk in the kingdom. You’re also getting them for a steal in comparison to what I had to pay in order to get these materials. You’re lucky I like you! There are all types of dresses to wear as Renaissance Faire costumes, such as our gorgeous German Renaissance Gown, fabulous Florentine Renaissance Gown, and voguish Viking Queen Gown.

Wench Costumes

What’s that now, dearie? You have a Princess friend who actually wants to wear something not so refined? I don’t believe you. What Princess would want to wear Wench Clothing when she could wear one of my majestic gowns? Well, I suppose if you came in here looking for Renaissance faire costumes it isn’t that much of a tall tale. Alright, well in this section of my shop, we have complete sets, bodices, corsets, Medieval skirts, Renaissance chemises, farthingales, and bumrolls. Whatever your friend needs to look the part she likes best.

So whatever type of Renaissance Faire Costumes you need, you’ll be able to find them in my shop. They are also guaranteed to make you stand out from the normal peasantry. If people like what they see, make sure you refer the back to PearsonsRenaissanceShoppe.com. Thank you dear, much appreciated. Have fun at your festival!This splendid Renaissance dress from award-winning series 'The Tudors' (two Emmy awards for Outstanding Costumes, etc.) was designed for the Catherine of Aragon character. This wonderful dress, Catherine of Aragon, was made of heavy dark blue velveteen, faux bead embellish the front part. Faux fur was sewn on the cuffs.

Medieval and Renaissance Clothing According to European History

bookPearson’sRenaissanceShoppe.com explains and reminds you all about the European history in the middle ages of 500 to 1500 AD and anything that is old or too old that is still accepted in the society till date. It contains medieval costumes and renaissance clothing that are still adored by many people today. The clothing are unique and designed in different ways. Our main aim is to help you create a feeling that will take you back and remember your history in aid of maintaining and commemorating your renaissance era as compared to now.

We have medieval dresses for women and children fit for different occasions, including; dancing, wedding, special visits to the renaissance in commemoration of the European history and even come together wear.

During the renaissance period, people were divided according to classes and there were the nobility that is people of a high class and the poor, low class. The clothing and costumes for these two different classes were designed to look different in order to differentiate the two classes.

We consider style when designing our renaissance clothing and medieval clothing based on these classes that existed among the European leaders and people. Modern people today, feel uncomfortable wearing the renaissance costumes, and our work is to make the costumes better but still to resemble the formal one.

The women’s medieval clothing come in all styles including the types of costume the princess of the country of Europe used to wear. Women buy this in remembrance of this renaissance period. Women’s clothes include medieval skirts, renaissance dresses, waist cinchers and under-bust corset sets, medieval wedding dresses, special order and custom made dresses among the many other types of medieval clothing a woman would love.

Same to the men’s medieval clothing, this site has types of different clothes men need to wear for different occasions, including; Tunics and Gambesons, Doublets, Jerkins and Vests, Men’s Renaissance shirts, Pants, breeches and kilts, coats, tabards and brigadines among many others that men can wear.

Pearsons Renaissance Shoppe also has all types of capes that reminds one of the Renaissance Era. The hooded medieval cloak adds some personality and brings in some kind of mystery to the other outfit you have, be it the gown or the costume you bought. Hooded cloaks for ladies are also available.

This site provide you a stop by opportunity to have a look at our beautiful renaissance costumes and medieval clothing of all kinds. Be it you need renaissance boots for an event, they are available. Men, women and children’s renaissance clothing are assured of getting well-dressed from the head to the bottom.

One should keep in mind that our renaissance costumes and medieval clothing are original and are just designed the same as those of our queens and kings back in the years. Some costumes have been slightly designed different from the formal ones since some people do not feel comfortable wearing the originally designed ones. Now you know and you are now well conversant with what we offer. In case you would love to acquire one, please visit our shop or go to our website to purchase one at a cheap, affordable price.

Renaissance Sales & Specials!

 

sale-journe-gown-3Have you seen the fabulous sale items at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe? This is a great chance to save on clearance, discontinued, and overstocked items! All items listed are NEW and NEVER worn. This sale is good for the quantities, colors, and sizes listed on the site and only while supplies last so hurry to get your Renaissance deals today!

One of the great options on sale right now from Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe is our elegant Queen Elizabeth Nobility Dress. Inspired by Renaissance Nobility style this one-piece dress closes with laces at the back and is boned to get that perfect silhouette. It sports graceful long hanging arms and is decorated with crystal and feathers. We recommend a hoop skirt for beneath your skirts to achieve the perfect profile.

If you are looking for something versatile to get the most out of your Ren Wear try Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe’s stylish Ren Doublet. This doublet is reversible, made of velveteen with a black twill backing so you can be the dashing nobleman or, with a simple flip of your doublet, a common peasant. Currently available in red or burgundy.

Take advantage of the great price on our Lady of Leeds Gown before they’re gone! This elegant full length gown features drop sleeves with a front split, lined with gold brocade fabric. This gown features an accented square neckline and elbows. Lacing up the back is provided to achieve your shapeliest fit!

Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe currently has several great separates on clearance! Our Charles Vane Pirate Shirt is made of thick rich Viscose fabric with a double ruffle down the chest and wrists fit for any dashing pirate. Our Dagget Sleeve Chemise tops come in several different colors. They’re baggy and versatile to be gathered and worn beneath a bodice, corset, or a waist cincher. They can be worn on or off the shoulders, fitting be ye a sassy wench or fine noble Lady. Our fashionable Maiden Skirts are made of 100% lightweight muslin cotton and are fully lined. These beauties are soft, breathable, and slightly transparent for any fine miss to shine with elegance. Pearson’s Period Cotton Shirts feature a stand up collar with a lace up front. Wide sleeves with an elastic gather at the wrists are roomy for any ample hunter needing room to pull his bow strings taught.

Get all of these fabulous treasures and more at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe Sales & Specials! Are you looking to expand your Renaissance wardrobe? Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have all the high quality Renaissance clothing, jewelry, and footwear to meet all your needs! We even have Renaissance clothing for little Ren fans. Shop Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe Sales & Specials today!

Renaissance Winter

It’s that time of year again where there is a nip in the air. The sparkling white snow is creating a chilly blanket across the fair land. Far and wide the people are donning their woolen coats, hooded capes, fine over gowns, and hooded cloaks. Are you in search of some fine winter garb? Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe has exactly what you need!

Have you seen Pearson’s Queen of Shemakhan Wool Coat? With details of Asian Manchoo Costume along with elements of the Balkanian style this is definitely an elegant choice for any authentic LARPer. This is a slim fit coat made of high quality natural wool with a black satin lining. The hood boasts a black faux fur boarder. Intricate ribbon trim accents this winter wonder. Accessories that come with this beautiful floor length coat are a  fur trimmed hat, a fur muff, and a matching wool bag.

Another fabulous option is our Templar Hooded Cape. Whether you are a fine Lord or Knight of the Realm this is the option for you! Made of white cotton with a velvet cross stitched over the left arm. The front is secured with a decorative rondel leather frog with a snap closure. It is 52 inches long and matches our Templar tunic. It also sports a hood to complete the look.

Are you interested in looking royal? Try our Anne Boleyn Overgown, designed for the Anne Boleyn character in the award winning series “The Tudors.” As the second and most famous wife of King Henry VIII this gown is fit for any Queen. A open outer robe made of heavyweight cotton and richly adorned with faux fur with openings at the elbows instead of sleeves for your arms. You’re sure to keep warm in this cuddly overgown on any cold winter day.

Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have cloaks for every need; from cotton, velvet, twill, wool, leather lined, and fur trimmed we have the hooded cloak that’s right for you. Our Medieval Wool Cloak is a great accessory for just about any attire. Made of heavy natural green wool with a handmade wool border, this warm cloak has no machine stitching at all and is a great authentic option.

Are you looking for a warm winter option to complete your Medieval Costume? Be sure to check out Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe’s great selection of Hooded Capes and Cloaks today!

The Truth About Corsets

When we think of corsets we think of the tight, pinching, poking, waist binding garments that we read about in historical romance novels. A garment any forward thinking modern woman would not wear. The truth is, however, that starting in the 16th century when they became popular, corsets were made for the person that was to wear them and them alone. At least up until the Victorian era when “mail order” corsets were created. Pinching was impossible and if they poked it meant that the boning had come loose from the corset. In the beginning corsets were not made to give you a small waist; the fabric would have given out if you had tried to tighten them enough to narrow your figure. They were designed to lift the breasts and create a smooth silhouette beneath clothing. Not until the mid to late 1800s when the metal grommet (1828) and the 2 part metal busk (1829) were created tightening a corset enough to drastically change a person’s figure was practically impossible.

As romance novels lead us to believe a heroine could go without her corset and her gowns will still fit perfectly and one wouldn’t notice her corset was missing until she was touched. The truth is that her gown would not fall correctly. It would even possibly be lumpy in places and, as with forgoing wearing a bra, her breasts would not be held up and would bounce with movement.

While being so uncomfortable as to lack the ability to breathe is untrue, it is a fact that you are unable to take deep breaths while wearing a corset. It is also true that a tightly tied corset can cause weals on the skin, just as a sock might around your ankle. If there was a weight gain or loss the corset would no longer fit properly and cause rubbing or the breasts to slip down in the corset which would be quite uncomfortable. If the corset has shoulder straps the arm movements would be somewhat limited; while our dear heroine would be able to fold her arms across her chest she would be unable to do so tightly. If she is wearing a busk she would be able to bend at the hips but not the waist. The strict rules in past times regarding posture are untrue although the corset does demand and encourage a straight back.

As with most things that go from person to person many things most people believe about corsets are false but they all come from an exaggeration of a truth. When worn properly and with the right fit a corset can be a lovely addition to any Lady or Lord’s Renaissance Garb.

Are you looking to add a corset to your medieval wardrobe? Here at Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe we have all the high quality corsets you could ask for to meet your needs! Be sure to shop Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe‘s Corset Collection today! Custom sizing and fitting is available to help you look your best!

A Modern Renaissance Soup

When I searched for authentic medieval recipes I came up with a lot of different options. I decided for my first foray into Medieval cooking that I would start simple and, with the help of my Queen of Renaissance Aunt, I decided to go with a Savory Barley Soup with Wild Mushrooms and Thyme that I found. Of course I was unable to find half of the required ingredients (or they cost a fortune, like saffron) so here is my personal version of the recipe:

Savory Barley Soup with Wild Mushrooms and Thyme

½ cup dry white wine

1 Tbs. Olive oil

½ cup chopped shallots

4 garlic cloves, minced

16oz cremini mushrooms, 8oz chopped, 8oz whole

1 tsp minced fresh thyme OR ½ tsp dried

4 cups vegetable broth

¾ cup pearl barley

3 cups water

1 Tbs tomato paste

2 tsp fresh squeezed lemon juice

Sea salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Directions:

Bring the wine to a simmer in a small saucepan. Add the mushrooms and allow the liquid to cook down, until the mushrooms are tender. Turn off the heat and set aside. In a large heavy pot warm the oil over medium-high heat. Add the chopped shallots and the minced garlic. Saute about 3 to 5 minutes or until the shallots are softened. Add the mushrooms from your saucepan, ¼ tsp salt, ¼ tsp pepper, and the thyme. Cook 1-2 minutes and then add the broth, tomato paste, barley, and water. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer until the barley is softened, about 45 to 50 minutes. Remove the soup from heat and allow to cool slightly. With a hand blender puree about 1 cup of the soup. Return to heat until hot, add lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste, and stir. Your soup is ready to eat! Serves 4-8 depending on bowl size.

 

We served our medieval soup in bread bowl trenchers. I started my dough for my bread bowls about 2.5 hours prior to my soup as they need at least 1.5 to 2 hours to rise. I know it’s not super authentic, being a white bread rather than black, but I knew no one in our family would actually eat a black bread so here is my modern medieval version.

Simple Bread Bowls

6 1/3 cup Flour

1 tbsp Salt

2 ¼ tsp Yeast x2 OR 2 pkgs

3 cups Water

1 tbsp EVOO

Directions:

Mix all dry ingredients in a large bowl. Add water and stir until fully incorporated. Kneading is not necessary, but I did a little to make sure everything was fully mixed. Remove your dough from the bowl, rinse the bowl and rub with EVOO (prevents dough from sticking.) Return dough to the bowl and cover with plastic wrap. Allow to sit in a warm area for 1-2 hours until the dough has doubled. Preheat your oven to 375 degrees. Punch down the dough and roll it out on a floured surface. (I doubled our bread bowl recipe and cut about 12 bowls.) With this recipe you should get at least 6 large bread bowls or 12 small – depending on how big you want your bread bowls to be. Round your dough and set on a baking sheet to rise again, allow about 20-30 minutes. They will rise more once you put them in the oven. Bake for about 40 minutes. Brush with melted butter or olive oil 10 minutes prior to removing them from the oven. This will give them a nice golden color. When done allow them to cool. Use a bread knife to cut the tops in a circle and use your fingers to even out the inside and make room for your soup. Serve with the top next to your bowl for dipping. Enjoy!

 

Medieval Accessories for the Knight in Your Life

There’s nothing quite as hansom as a well-dressed knight in shining armor, don’t you agree? But perhaps the renaissance clothing of the man in your life needs some, well, sprucing up? Have no fear! Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe is here, supplying you the very best in renaissance accessories, fitting every single style. From the stylish man, who adores looking cleaned up in royalty, to the rugged knight, ready to take on the seven seas, Pearson’s is your shop for it all!

For the Royal King: For the royal knight in your life, fashion comes first! For him, Pearson’s has the latest in renaissance accessories suited specifically for adding a touch of royalty. Shop items such as suede bags with brass accents, imperial-styled boots, leather trimmed cloaks and medieval crowns and scepters. These items are all about standing out, showing off one’s wealth, and simply being the King of the land. The key here is the more glimmering gold, the better!

For the Rugged Knight: If the knight in your life is all about excitement and adventure, take a journey through our selection of renaissance accessories perfectly suited for him! He’ll love renaissance accessories such as leather pirate boots, armory belts with brass accents, pirate pouches, and thick woolen leather capes. These items are not only stylish, but also functional, ready to offer protection when slaying dragons, sailing rough waters, or combating other knights.

For the Outdoorsy Noble Peasant: The outdoorsy peasant may not think he is in need of renaissance accessories, but you know that every so often, he deserves some great gifting! Show him your affections by shopping renaissance accessories that are fitting for his outdoor lifestyle. Accessories such as tunics, wrist cuffs, belt pouches and maverick boots are great for this man. They add a touch of style, while remaining useful during his outdoor journeys and adventures.

Spruce up the medieval wardrobe of the king, knight, or noble peasant in your life by shopping renaissance accessories! Here at Pearson’s, we know that every man is a little different. Some like the glimmer or gold, others like the rugged comfort of leather, while others still prefer accessories that are more functional than anything else. Fortunately, we’ve got all that and more and our renaissance accessories will turn any pirate into a prince!

Happy (Medieval) New Year’s!

Last month, we highlighted some holiday food traditions of the medieval period. While we’ll probably never get used to some of the recipes in that medieval cookbook, we certainly had a fun time reading about them! This month, we’re going to look at another holiday: New Year’s! Did you know that Julius Caesar declared January 1st the start of the new year because the month is named after the Roman god Janus, who was said to look into both the future and past with his two faces? Here are some facts about how people in the medieval period celebrated New Year’s.

  • The Council of Tours, a gathering of medieval Roman Catholic officials, abolished January 1st as the start of a new year in 567. It took Europe 561 years to agree that January 1st could be considered the start of the new year. The first nations to accept the date were Eastern European nations in 1362.
  • Before January 1st was adopted, countries in medieval times observed New Year’s on different days. For example, some countries chose to celebrate on December 25th while others considered March 25tgh the start of the new year.
  • England, in particular, had a tough time deciding when they wanted to celebrate the new year. Initially, they chose December 25th. Once William the Conqueror came into power, the date was changed to January 1st. Later, it was changed again to March 25th. It wasn’t until 1752 when January 1st became the final choice.

 

Medieval Bakers and Logos

 

At Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe, we don’t just sell medieval costumes. We love learning about the medieval era in history, and we aren’t alone! We’re finding great articles online every day all about some of the quirkier aspects of life during the medieval period. Recently, we came across an interesting article from GIZMODO about the connection between modern logos and medieval bakers.

According to Gizmodo, London in the 13th century came alive when pipes were installed to deliver clean water to the citizenry. As life became easier as a result of the clean water, businesses flourished. However, with booming businesses comes the business of swindlers.  

In order to protect the population of London from the shady practices of huckster bakeries, Henry III created a law that regulated food, called the Assize of Bread and Ale. This law regulated the size and weight of bread, flour purity, and pricing of said items. This law also protected the bakers themselves. Bad bakers could have easily raised the price of their bread out of proportion to grain prices. The result would have punished other bakers and lead to mass starvation. 

How did bakers let people and authorities know that their bread was up to snuff? Logos! A law was developed that required bakers to imprint their products with a unique symbol to make it easier to trace the bread to the baker. Hence, the start of logos!

Keeping Warm in the Medieval Era

 

It’s finally sweater weather! As we pull our sweaters and coats out from storage, we can’t help but wonder: how did people in the medieval era keep warm? We’ve all seen living conditions in movies and in previous Pearson’s Renaissance Shoppe blog posts and articles, and it really doesn’t seem like there was much of a barrier between medieval people and the blistering cold winter.  

The folks at the BBC did some of the hard work for us. Recently, they ran an article about what medieval people, specifically Robin Hood, might have done to stay warm during winter. The first defense against the cold was wool. Most of their clothing was made out of wool, with an extra next-to-body layer of linen. These materials were often layered to add to their effectiveness. Unfortunately, especially for someone like Robin Hood, perspiration limited the effectiveness of these materials. Medieval people had to remove layers until they cooled down (and dried off).

Medieval folks had winter accessories, albeit slightly different from ours. Their wool coats often came with a hood that would cover their coifs – a type of tight-fitting cap. They also wore gloves, but they were slightly different from the gloves we wear today. These gloves featured two fingers and a thumb, almost like today’s mittens.